Week 3: A Late Wrap Up

  1. First, I want to thank the facilitators for a great Week 3. I found all of the materials really thought-provoking and informative.  I will have to revisit them after this busy semester!  I am inspired to share key ideas with my online colleagues here at the college.
  2. Discussion Questions:

What?

  1. I thought a lot about the social presence, cognitive presence, and teaching presence concepts.    I really like the idea of exploring how students are present in these three ways.  How can I encourage more student-student teaching and problem-solving.   I also appreciated the reminder that the social presence is critical.  I am very aware of needing to create a safe place for my students and now I also want to encourage the interpersonal connections between students more.   Simple things like having them post their questions to the class  can help. I do want them to become greater resources for each other.

I also liked Heather Farmakis’s take on introducing herself to her classes. http://facultyecommons.org/building-rapport-establishing-relationships-in-online-courses/   I’d love to do something like this online, and I like the idea of telling students about our own educational journeys.  When I share parts of my experience as a student, they are all ears.

I reflected on the “sense of puzzlement> info exchange> through “applying new ideas” quite a bit and realized that sense of puzzlement is so quickly passed over at times.  Students need to puzzle, resist puzzling, and don’t really realize that’s what’s happening.  Instead they just feel uncomfortable and fearful.  I’d like to highlight this sequence for them and help them understand, “It’s all good!, ” but if they get stuck there in the puzzlement and it’s not generating the next steps of learning, they have to reach out for help.

Greg, thank you for this reminder on the effectiveness of questioning. http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/tomorrows-college/lectures/rethinking-teaching.html
It reminded me of a time when another mom turned to me and said, “You ask your son (5 at the time) a lot of questions! I love that.  How do you know to do that?”  I was really taken aback.  I guess I just found it so fascinating to engage him and hear from him.  I have to keep that alive with my students!
And, lastly, I bookmarked rubrics for discussion posts to adopt/adapt later.
So what? and What changes did you make?
  1. As students posted their first round of responses to a reading this week in a discussion forum, I went in and highlighted their salient points and I commented on each with a greater focus on asking them follow-up questions and directing them to other students’ posts (eg., “Oh, that sounds a lot like what Jenny said.  Is it?” or “This goes along with what Mitchell wrote in a way? What do you think?”  I noticed several student went back in and responded to each other this time… It’s building!  Also, on the announcements home page of the course, I wrote a little blurb with bullets like:  “Please go back to the Discussion forum where : ~  Jenny asked for help with her thesis. ~ Mitchell made a really interesting point about xyz ~ Pam gave Alice a great pat on the back. etc.   Gee, it’d be fun to move over to students doing this sort prompting!

And, I added a thought-provoking image to my home page with some questions to prompt their thinking.  I change it up weekly or every other week, but now, I just have to figure out if it’s too much to ask them to respond to such images as well or to give them a place where they can voluntarily discuss it.  I’m finding anything voluntary doesn’t get attention.   Sometimes, enough is enough.  Students are so busy!  Just putting the image and question up there for now may be just fine.

In my f2f readingn class, I introduced a blogging assignment — “A Reading Together Ritual” based off of these two touching NY Times articles that promote the idea of reading as a social act.

We talked about how can you really begin to id yourself as a reader?  Make it part of your social identity.    They’re responding to it well.  The students are sharing all sorts of interests and reading experiences.  This week I threw it out to them: “How do you want to continue with this blogging experiment? How can we sustain your interest and expand your interactions?”   This is new to me… I want this to become their baby; we’ll see if we can make it happen.

Enough for now!
Tanya
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